jezebel the cat

knightarcana:

fuckyeahplussizealternatives:

toomanyfandomssolittletime:

maahammy:

jadethemerman:

July 28th, 2014: Out and about in New York City

How problematic

im gonna fuckin throw up

Okay, okay calm down, people.

While you are all losing your mind over ‘cultural appropriation” of an Indian dress, nobody actually consulted THE INDIANS. 

In our country, if a foreigner wears an Indian saree, we actually appreciate it. It shows that the foreigner respects us enough to try our clothes. And the saree, mind you, is not a religious thing. Hindus can wear sarees, Muslims can wear sarees, Sikh’s can wear sarees, Jain’s can wear sarees and so on.

Like Americans have short dresses, compare that with sarees. Going to a party? Saree. Going to temple? Saree, and so on.

Some Indians wear it, some don’t. Some hate it and think its oppressing, some love embracing the unique style.

Point is, don’t hate on her for wearing this. Don’t hate on anyone for wearing sarees or any variations of sarees. We love to see others embracing our culture. Why do you think we open our gates to allow everyone to practice yoga and find spiritual meaning?

Culture is not meant to be kept within four walls, it should be spread.

I did not know this. That is really interesting to find out. Thanks for the information.

"Culture is not meant to be kept within four walls, it should be spread."

(Source: ladyxgaga)


  • (A young girl that is about 14 years old walks in. She gets some looks from our other patrons, as she has bright purple hair, multiple piercings, a leather jacket, and ripped jeans. It is freezing outside and she has a scowl on her face that makes me nervous.)
  • Me:“Hello, welcome to [coffee shop]. How may I help you?”
  • Young Girl:“I’ll take five of the largest black coffees you have, and ten of your ham and cheese sandwiches.”
  • Me:“Okay, will that be all?”
  • Young Girl:“Yeah.”
  • Me:“Your total is [price].”
  • (To my surprise, she pulls out a $100 bill. I am suspicious, and I check to make sure it’s real. It checks out, and I give her a bag with her sandwiches.)
  • Me:“Here is your change. Your coffee will be ready in a moment.”
  • (I keep an eye on her as she stands around glaring at anyone who looks at her. I see her looking at the tip jar. When I hand her the coffees, she asks me about it.)
  • Young Girl:“Your tip jar says that the money goes to you guys. Are any of you in college?”
  • Me:“Yes, I’m going to Rochester Institute of Technology. A few others are in college as well.”
  • Young Girl:“Good for you.”
  • (She pulls out the change I gave her and a few more $20 dollar bills. She crams then in the jar and salutes me jokingly before walking out. I am stunned, and chase after her. I find her on the street corner talking to some homeless people and handing out the sandwiches and coffee.)
  • Me:“Excuse me!”
  • Young Girl:“I’m sorry, did I forget something?”
  • Me:“No, but you just tipped us over $100 dollars. You’re also giving away a lot of food.”
  • Young Girl:“Yeah, my dad is crazy rich. I feel like I can do more if I actually interact with people instead of signing a check to a charity. Every Friday I gather anyone I see who needs a good meal, and buy it for them.” *she smiles brightly* “I may be young, but I can make a difference. I usually hand out flyers for homeless shelters or soup kitchens, too.”
  • (Without another word, she walks off silently. I didn’t stop smiling for the rest of the week. It goes to show you that appearances aren’t everything!)